Category Archives: Quiz

Quiz for February 23, 2021

Civil War Quiz: What Do You REALLY Know About Edmund Ruffin?

Q#1 – Edmund Ruffin was born on January 5, 1794. Where was his birthplace?

Q#2 – Who was Edmund Ruffin married to and how many children did they have?

Q#3 – In his twenties, long before he became an advocate for secession, what scientific activity did Ruffin become active in that gained him a degree of notoriety?

Q#4 – In addition to his work with marl, what was Ruffin’s chief agricultural legacy?

Q#5 – Because of his agricultural work, what title has been assigned to Edmund Ruffin?

Q#6 – As the political climate in the United States began to become polarized in the 1840s, Edmund Ruffin became a political activist with an organization named the Fire-Eaters—what were they?

Q#7 – In 1859, Ruffin traveled to attend the execution of John Brown at Charles Town, Virginia (now West Virginia), following the abolitionist’s abortive slave revolt at Harper’s Ferry earlier that year. Access to the general public was restricted; how did Ruffin gain access to the hanging?

Q#8 – After John Brown’s execution, Edmund Ruffin purchased several of the pikes captured from Brown and his forces, which had been intended to arm slaves in a general uprising. What did Ruffin do with the spikes?

Q#9 – In 1860, Ruffin published his book, “Anticipations of the Future, to Serve as Lessons for the Present Time.” What was the purpose of the book?

Q#10 – Ruffin is credited with firing one of the first shots from Morris Island against the federally held Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861. Who actually fired the first shot?

Q#11 – There was another first at Ft Sumter that is credited to Edmund Ruffin – what was it?

Q#12 – Two part question: 1) After Ft Sumter, Edmund Ruffin joined what military unit that participated in the First Battle of Manassas Junction? 2) What military action is Ruffin credited with performing at that battle?

Q#13 – Just moments after the Union Army retreated from Manassas Junction and left the battlefield, what did Edmund Ruffin do?

Q#14 – In 1865, Union soldiers overran one of Ruffin’s three plantations in the Tide Water region of Virginia. What graffiti did they write on his main house?

Q#15 – It is a well known fact that Edmund Ruffin committed suicide on June 18, 1865, despondent over the Confederacy’s loss of the Civil War. However, the suicide attempt did not go smoothly. What happened?

Quiz for January 26, 2021

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know about Native Americans in the Civil War?

Q#1 — This Native American served as adjutant and secretary to General Ulysses S. Grant. He wrote the final draft of the Confederate surrender terms at Appomattox. Who was he?

Q#2 — This Native American tribe suffered its own civil war within the Civil War, with bitter factions supporting either the south or the north. Name the tribe.

Q#3 — On June 25, 1865, this Native American was the last Confederate general in the field to cease hostilities at war’s end. Who was he?

Q#4 — This battle in Arkansas saw a combined force of Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek, and Seminole cavalry fighting for the Confederacy. Name it.

Q#5 — This Confederate general was appointed as Confederate envoy to Native American nations and was commissioned based on his ability to recruit Native Americans to the southern army. Who was he?

Q#6 — This battle was unique in the Civil War in that the white soldiers were the minority in both fighting forces with Native Americans making up a significant portion of each of the opposing armies and the Union force contained African-American units. Name the battle.

Q#7 — Two battles were fought near the present-day town of Big Cabin, Oklahoma, then in the Cherokee Nation within Indian Territory. What was the name of these two battles?

Q#8 — What happened to the Native American Tonkawa tribe on October 23–24, 1862?

Q#9 — The three pitched battles Battle of Round Mountain, the Battle of Chusto-Talasah, and the Battle of Chustenahlah fought between pro-Union Creek Indians and against Confederate troops and other Native Americans that joined the Confederates are collectively known as what?

Q#10 — The Third Colorado Cavalry was responsible for what action on November 29, 1864?

Q#11 — In July 1862, settlers fought against Santee Sioux in Minnesota. Who led the Sioux?

Q#12 — This famous American frontiersman was a colonel during the Civil War. He was responsible for forcing the Mescalero Apache and the Navajo onto a bleak reservation called Bosque Redondo. Name him.

Q#13 — How many Native Americans from the Indian Territory are estimated to have participated in the Confederate Army?

Q#14 — In 1862 the Union attempted an “Indian Expedition” into Indian Territory. Who commanded this expedition called and what was the outcome?

Q#15 — What was the impact on the Cherokee Nation as a result of the Union victory in the Civil War?

Quiz for December 29, 2020

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Civil War Cavalry?

Q#1 – The flamboyant Confederate cavalry commander of the Army of Northern Virginia went by the name Jeb Stuart – what did the letters J.E.B. stand for?

Q#2 – What was the name of the Union cavalry commander who led a raid thru Mississippi during April-May 1863? (Note: The John Wayne movie “Horse Soldiers” was based on this event)

Q#3 – What was the name given to the cavalry brigade that George Armstrong Custer commanded at the Battle of Gettysburg?

Q#4 – What was the nickname given to Confederate cavalry battalion commander John Singleton Mosby?

Q#5 – During the Civil War, what was the main mission of cavalry for both the Union & the Confederates?

Q#6 – What was the nickname Union cavalry troopers gave to Union commander Hugh Judson Kilpatrick?

Q#7 – It is well known that JEB Stuart was killed at the Battle of Yellow Tavern – who was the Union cavalry commander at that battle?

Q#8 – What is the name of the battle that was the largest predominantly cavalry engagement of the American Civil War, as well as the largest ever to take place on American soil?

Q#9 – What was the name of the Union cavalry commander who repulsed a flanking attack by Confederate Nathan Bedford Forrest that was instrumental in saving the Union Army at the Battle of Franklin in November 1864?

Q#10 – He was nicknamed the “Black Knight of the Confederacy”, commanded Stonewall Jackson’s cavalry forces in the Valley Campaign and was killed in battle in 1862 – what was his name?

Q#11 – How was Confederate general and cavalry officer John Hunt Morgan killed?

Q#12 – What was the name of Union cavalry general Philip Sheridan’s horse?

Q#13 – After Jeb Stuart was killed at the Battle of Yellow Tavern, who was named commander of the Confederate cavalry of the Army of Northern Virginia?

Q#14 – John Buford commanded two cavalry brigades on July 1, 1863 at the Battle of Gettysburg – what were the names of the two brigade commanders?

Q#15 – He was considered the tactical master of modern 19th-century mounted forces, wrote a cavalry tactics manual just prior to the Civil War that became the training and fighting textbook for troopers from both sides, and was called “The Father of the United States Cavalry” – what was his name?

Quiz for November 24, 2020

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Generals to Politicians and Politicians to Generals?

Q#1 – This Civil War general was very significant in the history of the Whig party. Who was he and why was he significant?

Q#2 – This general finished second in the 1880 presidential election. Name him.

Q#3 – This former congressman was appointed as a brigadier general in the Provisional Army of Tennessee and then was commissioned a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army. He was killed commanding troops at the Battle of Mill Springs. Name him.

Q#4 – John C. Breckinridge was the 14th vice-president of the United States and became a Confederate general. He was commander at what Confederate victory and what position in the Confederate government did he hold at the end of the war?

Q#5 – Of officers without previous military experience, he was one of three to achieve the rank of lieutenant general in the Confederate army. He was elected to the South Carolina General Assembly in 1852 and served as a state Senator from 1858 to 1861. After the Civil War he narrowly won the bloody 1876 election to became governor of South Carolina. Name him.

Q#6 – This professor and Civil War general was elected governor of Maine four times (1866, 1867, 1868, 1869). Name him.

Q#7 – This Civil War general and author made two unsuccessful bids for a seat in Congress (in 1868 and 1870) and was appointed territorial governor of the New Mexico Territory, where he served from August 1878 to March 1881. Name him and his most successful novel.

Q#8 – This Confederate cavalry commander in 1880 was elected from Alabama as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives. He later served as major general of volunteers in the Spanish-American war. Name him.

Q#9 – Future president Rutherford B. Hayes ended the war as a brevetted major general. In which campaigns of the war did he mainly serve?

Q#10 – Future brigadier general and president James A. Garfield only personally commanded at one battle. Name it.

Q#11– General George B. McClellan, as the democratic candidate, lost the 1864 Presidential election to Lincoln. Did ever he compete for any other political office?

Q#12 – This Civil War general was a member of the House of Representatives and an important ally to Illinois Senator Stephen A. Douglas. His commission as a general was based on Lincoln’s desire to retain political connections with the Democrats of Southern Illinois and he eventually became second in command under Ulysses S. Grant. Who was he?

Q#13 – How was General John C. Frémont, Union commander at the battle of Cross Keys, very significant in the history of the Republican party?

Q#14 – This Civil War general was a Republican member of the House of Representatives for Missouri prior to the war. He was appointed a colonel of Missouri volunteers in July 1862. He was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers in August 1862 and then to major general in November. He commanded a division in the Vicksburg campaign and in the fighting about Chattanooga, and was one of William T. Sherman’s corps commanders in the final campaigns in Georgia and the Carolinas. After the war he opposed the Congressional Reconstruction policy, and on that issue left the Republican Party. In 1868, he was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for vice president, running with Horatio Seymour. Who was he?

Q#15 – He was an attorney, the first Chief Justice of Kansas, and leading free state advocate and Union Army general during the American Civil War, commanding the defense of Fort Davidson at Pilot Knob, Missouri, during Sterling Price’s raid. After the war he became a two-term United States Congressman from Ohio, 1877–1881, and narrowly lost the 1880 campaign for Ohio Governor. Who was he?

Quiz for October 27, 2020

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About The South’s Reasons For Secession?

Q#1 – During the election in 1860, Abraham Lincoln ran on a message of leaving slavery to where it currently existed, which should have been viewed by Southerners in a positive way. What were the two reasons Southerners still did not vote for Lincoln?

Q#2 – What was the legal basis by which Southern states believed that they had the right to secede from the United States?

Q#3 – What was the complaint by Southern states regarding the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850?

Q#4 – There were some inconsistencies among the Southern states regarding the reasons they included in their individual ordinances of secession. Three states—Texas, Alabama, and Virginia—specifically mentioned one obvious condition; the rest made no mention it; what was the condition?

Q#5 – What was the prevailing belief among the Southern states that slaveholding was a constitutional right and that the movement to abolish slavery and that movement’s influence over the politics of the northern states justified secession?

Q#6 – In the Texas Ordinance of Secession there was condition unique to that state that did not exist in the other Southern states, which Texas believed was another reason that justified secession. What was that condition?

Q#7 – The Supreme Court 1857 Dred Scott decision in effect declared unconstitutional one critical requirement of the 1820 Missouri compromise that the Federal government refused to honor. What was that requirement that was declared unconstitutional?

Q#8 – What was the adverse political impact regarding prohibiting slavery in the new western territories that was another reason justifying secession by the Southern states?

Q#9 – What was a main reason that the Southern states thought that if their secession from the Union led to civil war, France and Britain would intervene on their behalf?

Q#10 – There was a last ditch effort to end the secession crisis through a Constitutional amendment. What was the effort and its result?

Q#11 – How did the “Homestead Act” of 1860 serve as another reason for Southern states to secede from the Union?

Q#12 – How did the Pacific Railway Bill of 1860 provide additional justification for the South to secede from the Union?

Q#13 – Why were the implementation of tariffs one of the root causes that Southerners used to justify secession?

Q#14 – Why was the effort to create a system of banks that would be chartered and regulated by the federal government a reason Southern states believed helped to justify secession?

Q#15 – While most states in the Confederacy simply passed Ordinances of Secession, South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, Texas, and Virginia included what other justifications in their ordinances?

Quiz for September 29, 2020

Civil War Quiz: What Happened During the Month of September 1861-1865

Q#1 – On September 6, 1861, General Ulysses S. Grant captured which city in Kentucky unopposed?

Q#2 – On September 11, 1861, who did President Abraham Lincoln have Secretary of War Simon Cameron order the arrest of?

Q#3 – September 12-15, 1861, what was the name of the first battle in which Robert E. Lee led troops into combat?

Q#4 – On September 1, 1862, what was the name of the battle where Union Major General Phillip Kearny was killed when he crossed Rebel lines while riding his horse?

Q#5 – September 5, 1862, what military maneuver did Robert E. Lee perform with his Army of Northern Virginia?

Q#6 – On September 22, 1862, what policy action did President Lincoln perform?

Q#7 – On September 27, 1862, the Confederate Congress passed what significant legislation that directly affected the Confederate armies in the field?

Q#8 – Also on September 27, 1862, what was the significance regarding the formation of the First Regiment Louisiana Native Guard?

Q#9 – During the period September 3-5, 1863, what specific action by the British government dashed any remaining Confederate hopes of British support during the war?

Q#10 – On September 9, 1863, Federal troops entered what major Southern City after it was abandoned by the Confederate Army of Tennessee?

Q#11 – September 9, 1863, after consultation between General Robert E. Lee and Confederate President Jefferson Davis regarding the war effort in the Tennessee/Georgia theater, what action did Confederate General James Longstreet begin?

Q#12 – On September 15, 1863, using the authority granted him by the Habeas Corpus Suspension Act of 1863, what conditions did President Lincoln use for suspending the writ of habeas corpus?

Q#13 – On September 1, 1864, the Confederates began the evacuation of what major Southern City?

Q#14 – On September 4, 1864, what significant event occurred regarding the Confederate General John Hunt Morgan?

Q#15 – On September 27, 1864, a small Confederate force under “Bloody” Bill Anderson was involved in what action?

Quiz for August 25, 2020

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About the American Civil War in the Movies?

Q#1 – This 2003 movie starring Jude Law and Nicole Kidman depicts the Battle of the Crater. Name it.

Q#2 – This 1965 film saw the character played by Jimmy Stewart save his captured Confederate son-in-law played by Doug McClure from a train. Name it.

Q#3 – In the movies Gettysburg and Gods and Generals, this person has a cameo role playing Colonel Waller Tazewell Patton. Who is he?

Q#4 – Speaking of cameo appearances, who played Hancock’s aide in Gettysburg?

Q#5 – Ang Lee is a director famous for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. He also directed a Civil War movie starring Tobie Maguire. Name the movie.

Q#6 – In the movie True Grit, Rooster Cogburn had a cat named after a Civil War general. What was its name?

Q#7 – The Spaghetti western The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, depicts three gunslingers competing to find a fortune in Confederate gold during the New Mexico campaign of 1862. Who played the Good, who played the Bad, and who played the Ugly?

Q#8 – The first part of this controversial 1915 film takes place before and during the Civil War. Part II depicts Reconstruction and shows the Ku Klux Klan as a heroic force. Name it.

Q#9 – This 1940 movie stars Errol Flynn as Jeb Stuart, Ronald Reagan as George Armstrong Custer, and Raymond Massey as John Brown. Name it.

Q#10 – The 2015 film Field of Lost Shoes depicted what famous group at what battle?

Q#11 – Who did John Wayne and Henry Morgan play in the movie How the West was Won?

Q#12 – This 1951 Civil War potboiler stared Barbara Payton. Name it.

Q#13 – This 2016 movie starring Matthew McConaughey shows the true story of a revolt against the Confederacy in Mississippi. Name it.

Q#14 – Besides the attack on Fort Wagner, what other battles are depicted in the movie Glory?

Q#15 – This 1991 TV movie starring Virginia Madsen depicts the naval battle between the Monitor and the Merrimack. Name it.

Quiz for April 28, 2020

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Generals to Politicians and Politicians to Generals?

This quiz was created by Roundtable member Mark Costin.

Q#1 – This Civil War general was very significant in the history of the Whig party. Who was he and why was he significant?

Q#2 – This general finished second in the 1880 presidential election. Name him.

Q#3 – This former congressman was appointed as a brigadier general in the Provisional Army of Tennessee and then was commissioned a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army. He was killed commanding troops at the Battle of Mills Springs. Name him.

Q#4 – John C. Breckinridge was the 14th vice-president of the United States and became a Confederate General. He was commander at what Confederate victory and what position in the Confederate government did he hold at the end of the war.

Q#5 – Of officers without previous military experience, he was one of three to achieve the rank of lieutenant general in the Confederate army. He was elected to the South Carolina General Assembly in 1852 and served as a state Senator from 1858 to 1861. After the Civil War he narrowly won the bloody 1876 election to became governor of South Carolina. Name him.

Q#6 – This professor and Civil War general was elected governor of Maine 4 times (1866, 1867, 1868, 1869). Name him.

Q#7 – This Civil War general and author made two unsuccessful bids for a seat in Congress (in 1868 and 1870) and was appoint territorial governor of the New Mexico Territory, where he served from August 1878 to March 1881. Name him and his most successful novel.

Q#8 – This Confederate cavalry commander in 1880 was elected from Alabama as a Democrat to the United States House of Representatives. He later served as major general of volunteers in the Spanish-American war. Name him.

Q#9 – Future president Rutherford B. Hayes ended the war as a brevetted major general. In which campaigns of the war did he mainly serve?

Q#10 – Future brigadier general and president James A. Garfield only personally commanded at one battle. Name it.

Q#11– General George B. McClellan, as the democratic candidate, lost the 1864 Presidential election to Lincoln. Did ever he compete for any other political office?

Q#12 – This Civil War general was a member of the House of Representatives and an important ally to Illinois Senator Stephen A. Douglas. His commission as a general was based on Lincoln’s desire to retain political connections with the Democrats of Southern Illinois and he eventually became second in command under Ulysses S. Grant. Who was he?

Q#13 – How was General John C. Frémont, Union commander at the battle of Cross Keys, very significant in the history of the Republican party?

Q#14 – This Civil War general was a Republican member of the House of Representatives for Missouri prior to the war. He was appointed a colonel of Missouri volunteers in July 1862. He was promoted brigadier general of volunteers in August 1862 and then to major general in November. He commanded a division in the Vicksburg campaign and in the fighting about Chattanooga, and was one of William T. Sherman’s corps commanders in the final campaigns in Georgia and the Carolinas. After the war he opposed the Congressional Reconstruction policy, and on that issue left the Republican Party. In 1868, he was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for vice president, running with Horatio Seymour. Who was he?

Q#15 – He was an attorney, the first Chief Justice of Kansas and leading free state advocate and Union Army general during the American Civil War commanding the defense of Fort Davidson at Pilot Knob, Missouri during Sterling Price’s raid. After the war he became a two-term United States Congressman from Ohio, 1877–1881 and narrowly lost the 1880 campaign for Ohio Governor. Who was he?

Quiz for February 25, 2020

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About President Andrew Johnson’s Impeachment Trial of 1868?

Q#1 – What policies by President Andrew Johnson began to sow the seeds for his impeachment?

Q#2 – At an impasse with Congress over Reconstruction, during the summer of 1866, President Johnson offered himself directly to the American public where he asked his audiences for their support in his battle against the Congress and urged voters to elect representatives to Congress in the upcoming midterm election who supported his policies. What name was given to this effort?

Q#3 – What was the Tenure of Office Act?

Q#4 – Johnson wanted to get rid of Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. In an attempt to circumvent the Tenure of Office restrictions, Johnson suspended Stanton and tried to replace him with what person?

Q#5 – Who was Lorenzo Thomas and what was his role that helped influence Congress to draw up Articles of Impeachment?

Q#6 – What were the names of the two Congressmen who introduced to the House of Representatives the impeachment resolution?

Q#7 – On February 24, 1868, the House of Representatives voted in favor of the resolution to impeach the President for high crimes and misdemeanors. What was the vote tally?

Q#8 – The House of Representatives adopted eleven articles of impeachment against the President. These were group into three categories – what were the categories?

Q#9 – When the Senate convened as the Court of Impeachment, what was the name of the Presiding Officer?

Q#10 – The President’s Defense team consisted of five individuals. What was the name of the person who led the team?

Q#11 – The Senate Prosecution team issued a summons for President Johnson to appear at the impeachment trial. What was the reason he did not appear?

Q#12 – The impeachment trial was conducted mostly in open session, and the Senate chamber galleries were filled to capacity throughout. Public interest was so great that the Senate took what action in this regard?

Q#13 – During the testimony portion of the impeachment trial, how many prosecution witnesses were called; how many defense witnesses were called?

Q#14 – There were three separate votes taken during the trial, each resulting in a vote of 35 senators voting guilty and 19 not guilty. What was the breakdown by political party of the not guilty votes and why was Johnson not impeached?

Q#15 – What is Republican Senator Edmund Ross of Kansas famous for?

Quiz for January 28, 2020

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About These Obscure Facts of the Civil War?

Q#1 – While rifles and cannons were the deadliest weapons during the war, disease killed more men. Camps became breeding grounds for measles, chicken pox, and mumps. One million Union solders contracted which disease?

Q#2 – What was the age of the youngest soldier in the Civil War who came from Mississippi? What was the age of the oldest soldier in the Civil War who came from Iowa?

Q#3 – What was the original name for Memorial Day?

Q#4 – A Union prison camp had two observation towers constructed for onlookers. Citizens paid 15 cents to look at the inmates. Concession stands by the towers sold peanuts, cakes, and lemonade while the men inside starved. What was the prison camp’s name?

Q#5 – The Twenty-Sixth North Carolina Infantry at Gettysburg is known for what bloody statistic?

Q#6 – During the Civil War, more Civil War soldiers died from what disease than were killed in battle?

Q#7 – What happened to President Lincoln’s personal copy of the Emancipation Proclamation that would be worth millions if it were still in existence today?

Q#8 – General George Gordon Meade was the victor at the Battle of Gettysburg, the largest battle ever fought in North America. Where was Meade born?

Q#9 – An estimated four million slaves lived in the South by 1860. What was their estimated worth at the time?

Q#10 – What was the name of not only the first woman surgeon in U.S. Military history, but she was also the only woman in the Civil War to be awarded the Medal of Honor?

Q#11 – What was the criminal offense that produced over 100,000 Court Martials during the Civil War?

Q#12 – Although both the North and South did not allow women in the army, how many it is estimated actually fought disguised as men?

Q#13 – What were “Quaker guns”?

Q#14 – The first U.S. Medal of Honor was awarded during the Civil War on March 25, 1863. Who was it awarded to?

Q#15 – In 1860, which two states actually had more slaves than free people living in them?

Quiz for November 26, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Medals Awarded in Connection with the Civil War?

Q#1 – How many Congressional Medals of Honor were awarded to US Colored Troop army soldiers during the Civil War?

Q#2 – Most of the Medals of Honor awarded to US Colored Troop soldiers were the result of valorous actions in just one battle – what was the name of the battle?

Q#3 – Which Union general nominated more US Colored Troop soldiers to receive the Medal of Honor than any other?

Q#4 – How many Medals of Honor were awarded to African-Americans sailors of the union navy?

Q#5 – Most of the Medals of Honor awarded to African-Americans sailors of the Union Navy were the result of valorous actions in just one battle – what was the name of the battle?

Q#6 – How many Medals of Honor were awarded to US Colored Troop army soldiers during the Battle of Fort Wagner?

Q#7 – In total, how many Medals of Honor were awarded to African-Americans for actions during the Civil War?

Q#8 – Why is Mary Edwards Walker significant in terms of the Medal of Honor?

Q#9 – The first Medals of Honor were awarded for action in what engagement?

Q#10 – The youngest Medal of Honor recipient was how old during the engagement for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor?

Q#11 – How many medals for valor were awarded by the Confederate States?

Q#12 – What is the Confederate Medal of Honor?

Q#13 – Was the Purple Heart awarded to any Civil War participants?

Q#14 – What medal was awarded to both Union and Confederate soldiers?

Q#15 – How many Medals of Honor were awarded during the Civil War?

Quiz for October 29, 2019

Civil War Quiz: “Ripley’s Believe It or Not” About the Civil War

Q#1 – Why did the combat death of Confederate Brigadier General Ben Hardin Helm result in him becoming the only Southerner to cause conspicuous mourning in Washington during the Civil War?

Q#2 – What was the name of the very famous Union General who, coming upon the mansion of a woman he had once courted, put the place under guard and left a message for his erstwhile sweetheart which read: “You once said that you would pity the man who would ever become my enemy. My answer was that I would ever protect and shield you. This I have done. Forgive me all else. I am but a soldier”?

Q#3 – What was the name of Mary Todd Lincoln’s closest confidant during the war and her principal comfort on the death of the president, who was also a black seamstress who had once been employed by Mrs. Jefferson Davis?

Q#4 – What was the name of the Union general who in 1861 had accompanied Abraham Lincoln on his journey from Springfield, Illinois, to Washington and in 1865 accompanied Lincoln’s body when it was returned to Springfield for burial?

Q#5 – What was Union Major General William T. Sherman’s estimated dollar amount worth of damage on Georgia resulting from his “March to the Sea”?

Q#6 – Confederate General John B. Hood lost his right leg at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1863. In what country was his fine cork leg manufactured?

Q#7 – When some of his men cheered news of Lincoln’s assassination, what was the name of the Confederate general who became noticeably angry and shouted the following: “Shut those men up. If they don’t shut up, have them arrested”?

Q#8 – What wife of a most senior Union political official had three relatives that served in the Confederate Army?

Q#9 – What famous Confederate general lost 29 horses shot out from under him during the war, probably a world’s record?

Q#10 – During the War Between the States, what happened to Robert E. Lee’s hair?

Q#11 – Of the 245,000 wounds treated in Union hospitals during the Civil War, what number and percentage were inflicted by bayonet?

Q#12 – In 1860, what was the reason given by Federal ordnance officials for turning down the Spencer repeating breech-loading rifle?

Q#13 – What makes 70-year old Hugh McVey, who served in Company D, 4th Kentucky Infantry in the Confederate Army, and was killed at Shiloh an oddity in the Civil War? (Hint: Think something European.)

Q#14 – As the armies from both sides surged to and fro in the Northern Shenandoah Valley, how many times did the town of Winchester, Virginia, change hands during the war?

Q#15 – Of the 425 Confederate generals, 77 were killed or died of wounds during the war. What is the name of the last surviving general of the Southern armies who lived until 1914 and whose son and namesake was killed as a general in World War II?

Quiz for September 14, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Union Admirals David Dixon Porter and David Farragut?

Q#1 – David Farragut was the first person to reach three ranks in the United States Navy. What were the titles of these ranks?

Q#2 – Who was David Dixon Porter’s adoptive brother?

Q#3 – When David Porter began his naval service as a midshipman at the age of 10 years, what was the name of the relative he served under?

Q#4 – After the war, David Farragut oversaw the construction of the first U.S. Navy base established on the Pacific Ocean. What was the name of this base?

Q#5 – In 1824, Farragut was placed in command of USS Ferret and served in the Mosquito Fleet. What was the purpose of this fleet?

Q#6 – As part of the Navy Department’s plans to open the Mississippi River during the Civil War, what where the names of the two Confederate forts on the Mississippi River that Porter bombarded beginning on April 18, 1862?

Q#7 – In February, 1862, as part of the Union “Anaconda Plan”, what was the name of the command that Farragut was given command of?

Q#8 – The March 15, 1863, attack on Port Hudson failed and resulted in Farragut’s flotilla incurring heavy damage to his warships because of what unilateral decision made by Farragut?

Q#9 – Porter was not held in high regard by which of President Lincoln’s Cabinet secretaries who called Porter “a gas bag … blowing his own trumpet and stealing credit which belongs to others”?

Q#10 – What was the reason that Porter was not in favor of the March 1864 Red River Expedition led by General Nathaniel P. Banks?

Q#11 – On August 5, 1864, Farragut won a great victory in the Battle of Mobile Bay and is famous for being quoted for the phrase “Damn the torpedoes….. full speed ahead”. What incident during the battle caused Farragut to make this statement?

Q#12 – By late summer 1864, what was the name of the only Confederate port open for running the blockade that Porter was ordered to close?

Q#13 – As part of the January 13, 1865, attack on Fort Fisher, Porter imposed what new methods of bombardment for his warships?

Q#14 – In 1890 Porter became the founding president of what organization?

Q#15 – What was the name of Farragut’s last active naval command and what special honor was he accorded after he retired?

Quiz for August 27, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Civil War Battlefield Preservation and National Cemeteries?

Q#1 – When did the U.S. Congress authorize the creation of military burial places during the Civil War?

Q#2 – What were the first three efforts at Civil War memorialization during the war itself?

Q#3 – What battlefield and cemetery that were established in 1862, but title to the land was not transferred to the War Department until 1877?

Q#4 – Who began erecting markers on battlefields beginning with the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861?

Q#5 – What is the oldest surviving monument Civil War monument and where is it located?

Q#6 – In the 1890s, the United States government established five Civil War battlefield parks under the jurisdiction of the War Department. Two were: Antietam National Battlefield in Maryland and Gettysburg National Military Park in Pennsylvania; what were the other three?

Q#7 – The modern Civil War battlefield preservation movement began in 1987 with the founding of what organization?

Q#8 – In 1991, the original Civil War Trust organization was initially created in the mold of what other organization?

Q#9 – From 1987 through late 2017, the Civil Trust and its predecessor organizations saved more than 40,000 acres at how many Civil War battlefields and sites in 21 states?

Q#10 – The American Civil War was the defining event in our nation’s history. Between 1861 and 1865 approximately how many battles and engagements were fought across the continent from Vermont to the New Mexico Territory, and beyond?

Q#11 – Starting in 1991, what event caused interest in the Civil War to soar and led to major donations to various preservation battlefield organizations?

Q#12 – Whose efforts 25 years after the Civil War resulted in the creation of these national military parks: Gettysburg, Shiloh, Antietam, Vicksburg, Chickamauga?

13 – In the mid-1890s, what planned action led to a Supreme Court decision that established the government’s right to acquire and condemn land in the interest of historic preservation?

Q#14 – What was the “Antietam Plan” that was developed in the second half of the 19th Century related to how battlefield preservation specifications were defined?

Q#15 – What is thought to be the first monument to be erected on a Civil War battlefield?

Quiz for July 30, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About the “Lost Cause” of the Confederacy?

Q#1 – When and where did the term “Lost Cause” first appear?

Q#2 – What was the objective of the “Lost Cause”?

Q#3 – Why were so many white Southerners devastated economically, emotionally, and psychologically by the defeat of the Confederacy in 1865?

Q#4 – How did believers in the “Lost Cause” explain the Confederate defeat?

Q#5 – How did many who advocated the virtues of the “Lost Cause” portray the slavery system?

Q#6 – What purpose did these Southern memorial associations such as the United Confederate Veterans, the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and Ladies Memorial Associations have in advancing the concepts of the “Lost Cause”?

Q#7 – How did proponents of the “Lost Cause” movement view the Reconstruction that followed the Civil War?

Q#8 – The 1881 publication of “The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government” by Jefferson Davis, a two-volume defense of the Southern cause, provided what important justification in the history of the Lost Cause?

Q#9 – How did Robert E. Lee indirectly help in advancing the beliefs central to the “Lost Cause”?

Q#10 – Confederate Memorial Literary Society (CMLS), founded by elite white women in Richmond, Virginia, in the 1890s, established the Confederate Museum. What was the main purpose of the Museum?

Q#11 – What was the primary role of The United Daughters of the Confederacy as it related to the “Lost Cause”?

Q#12 – What was one method employed by The United Daughters of the Confederacy that helped promulgate the Lost Cause’s ideology?

Q#13 – What financial and economic action did proponents of the “Lost Cause” initiate to help reduce the severe poverty prevalent in the South after the Civil War?

Q#14 – In October 1875, the second son of General Robert E. Lee made the following statement at the Annual Meeting of the Virginia Division: “I object to the phrase too often used—South as well as North—that the Confederates fought for what they thought was right. They fought for what they knew was right. They, like the Greeks, fought for home, the graves of their sires, and their native land”. What was this person’s name?

Q#15 – “Lost Cause” advocates viewed Confederate generals such as Lee, Albert Sidney Johnston, and Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson as representing the virtues of Southern nobility and fought bravely and fairly. How did these same people view Northern generals?

Quiz for June 25, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About These Civil War Authors and Historians?

Q#1 – Who was the American historian, noted for his writing on the American Civil War, who was widely acclaimed for his book on The Origins of the Republican Party, 1852-1856, which is still considered one of the most important books ever written on 19th-century American politics?

Q#2 – Who was the author who, in 1988, published his Pulitzer-winning book Battle Cry of Freedom?

Q#3 – This famous Civil War author and historian was inspired by his planter grandfather, who had died two years before his birth. Who was he?

Q#4 – After the publication of Captain Sam Grant (1950) by historian and biographer Lloyd Lewis, who wrote the second and third volumes of this trilogy?

Q#5 – Who is this author who has long been considered a leading authority on the Reconstruction Era of American history as evidenced by his seminal essay in American Heritage in October 1982?

Q#6 – The founding executive director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies research and education center is also considered the preeminent scholar on Confederate Lieutenant General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson. Who is he?

Q#7 – What well renowned Civil War historian made this profound quote: “I don’t want to call it a conspiracy to ignore the role of the Blacks, both above and below the Mason-Dixon Line, but it was definitely a tendency that began around 1910”?

Q#8 – This famous author and Civil War historian won the 2005 Lincoln Prize (for the best book about the American Civil War) for her 2005 book about Abraham Lincoln’s presidential cabinet. Part of the book was adapted by Tony Kushner into the screenplay for Steven Spielberg’s 2012 film Lincoln. Who is she?

Q#9 – Who is the Bay Area author who wrote Brady’s Civil War Journal: Photographing the War, 1861-65?

Q#10 – This famous Civil War author’s initial interest in the history of the Civil War first began after an eighth grade school field trip to the Gettysburg battlefield. Who is he?

Q#11 – Who is this now deceased famous Civil War author and historian who is attributed to this quote: “The point I would make is that the novelist and the historian are seeking the same thing: the truth – not a different truth: the same truth – only they reach it, or try to reach it, by different routes?

Q#12 – This famous Civil War historian was named Chief Historian of the National Park Service, a position he held until 1994. From 1994 to 1995, he served as special assistant to the director. After his retirement in 1995, he received the title Chief Historian Emeritus, which he holds to this day. What is his name?

Q#13 – Civil War Times (formerly Civil War Times Illustrated) is a history magazine published bi-monthly that covers the American Civil War. It was established in 1962 by whom?

Q#14 – Who is this American documentarian known for his style of using archival footage and photographs in his films?

Q#15 – Which Civil War historian served for nine years as co-chairman of the United States Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, appointed to the commission by President Bill Clinton in 2000, and elected co-chair by his fellow commissioners?

Quiz for May 28, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About the Presidential Election of 1860?

Q#1 – Why didn’t incumbent President James Buchanan run for re-election in 1860?

Q#2 – The Republican Party replaced what then defunct political party as the major opposition to the Democrats?

Q#3 – The Constitutional Union Party replaced what two political parties?

Q#4 – The Republican Party held its nominating convention in Chicago. What was the name of the temporary wood-frame assembly hall it was held in?

Q#5 – Lincoln’s nomination at the Republican Party’s convention was a surprise. Who was the favorite before the convention was held?

Q#6 – There were two Democratic National Conventions in 1860; why?

Q#7 – In what city were the two 1860 Democratic National Conventions held?

Q#8 – Abraham Lincoln was the Republican Party nominee; Stephen Douglas was the Northern Democratic Party nominee. Who were the nominees for the Southern Democratic and Constitutional Union parties?

Q#9 – Hannibal Hamlin was Lincoln’s VP running mate. What was the name of Stephen A. Douglas’s VP running mate?

Q#10 – What were some of the critical key differences between modern presidential elections and those of the mid-nineteenth century?

Q#11 – What was the main campaign platform that Stephen Douglas, the Northern Democrat’s presidential candidate, ran on?

Q#12 – What was the only state in which Stephen A. Douglas won the Electoral College vote?

Q#13 – Percentage wise, the voter turnout for the 1860 presidential election was the highest in American history up to that time; what was the percent?

Q#14 – What percentage of the popular vote did Lincoln win?

Q#15 – Abraham Lincoln, the endorsed Republican candidate for President, didn’t even appear on ten states’ ballots in 1860. What were those states?

Quiz for April 30, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About the Funeral and Burial of Abraham Lincoln?

Q#1 – After being assassinated, where was Lincoln’s body first laid in state?

Q#2 – A catafalque was hastily constructed to support the casket of Abraham Lincoln while the president’s body lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda in Washington, DC. What happened to that catafalque after Lincoln’s body was removed?

Q#3 – At the funeral service in Washington DC, who offered the sermon and also a prayer and benediction, which moved many listeners to tears?

Q#4 – Lincoln was laid in State in 12 locations; which two locations that were located in the same state are missing from this list: Washington, DC, Baltimore, MD, Harrisburg, PA, Philadelphia, PA, New York City, Albany, NY, Buffalo, NY, Indianapolis, IN, Chicago, IL, and Springfield, IL?

Q#5 – What name was given to Lincoln’s funeral train which had his portrait fastened to the front of the engine above the cattle guard?

Q#6 – What was the purpose of the pilot train that preceded Lincoln’s funeral train?

Q#7 – Why did Lincoln’s funeral train take the 1654 mile route that it did?

Q#8 – Why was Lincoln’s funeral train limited to 20 miles an hour?

Q#9 – In addition to Lincoln’s body, there was a second body on the funeral train; whose body was it?

Q#10 – Why did Lincoln’s wife Mary Todd Lincoln remain at the White House and not travel on the funeral train?

Q#11 – The funeral procession in New York City had the most number of horses of all the processions used to draw Lincoln’s hearse – how many horses were used?

Q#12 – During Lincoln’s funeral procession in New York City, what future US President watched the procession with his grandfather?

Q#13 – What was the name of the cemetery in Springfield, IL, where Lincoln was interred?

Q#14 – What happened to the railroad car that so famously carried Lincoln’s body to its final resting place?

Q#15 – In November 1876, why did Chicago counterfeiter James “Big Jim” Kennally plan to steal Lincoln’s body?

Quiz for March 26, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Foreign Involvement in the Civil War?

Q#1 – Why were the vast majority of European nations extremely cautious when dealing with the United States of America during the Civil War, usually attempting to remain neutral during its duration?

Q#2 – What global decree did the United States Government issue at the beginning of the Civil War?

Q#3 – What was the main reason behind Great Britain’s considering to become involved in the American Civil War?

Q#4 – On May 13, 1861, what proclamation was issued by Great Britain’s Queen Victoria regarding the American Civil War?

Q#5 – Where was a vast majority of the Confederate Navy built?

Q#6 – During the early period of the Civil War, there was increasing sentiment for Great Britain to join the American Civil War in favor of the Confederate States of America. What event prevented this?

Q#7 – What action did the Confederate government threatened England and France with if they did not assist them in the war?

Q#8 – What was the official position of France regarding any possible involvement in the Civil War?

Q#9 – Why did many French industrialists and politicians wish for a quick Confederate victory?

Q#10 – Under the orders of Emperor Napoleon III, French troops landed in Mexico in December 1861 for trade and plans of a transoceanic canal. What was the position of the Federal government regarding the French action? What was the position of the Confederate government regarding the French action?

Q#11 – What deal did the Confederate delegate in Paris, John Slidell, offer to Napoleon III in exchange for French recognition of the Confederate States and naval help sent to break the blockade?

Q#12 – The Confederate delegate John Slidell succeeded in negotiating a loan of $15,000,000 that was used to buy ironclad warships as well as military supplies that came in by blockade runners. Who loaned the Confederacy the money?

Q#13 – What was the name of the ironclad that in keeping with its official neutrality, the French government blocked the sale of to the Confederacy in February 1864?

Q#14 – Czarist Russia initially showed support for the North. What military action did they perform in support of the Northern war effort?

Q#15 – What action did the Federal government attempt to pursue that involved the Netherlands?

Quiz for February 26, 2019

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About the Causes for the Civil War Other Than Slavery?

Q#1 – Historically, why did southern slave-holding states have little perceived need for industrialized mechanization?

Q#2 – Why were the Northern states generally opposed to the South’s right to sell cotton and purchase manufactured goods from any nation?

Q#3 – When the Southerners Democrats controlled Congress in the 1830s, 1840s, and 1850s, what legislative actions did they take to favor the Southern economy?

Q#4 – In the 1850s, what legislative actions did the Republican-controlled Congress take to protect Northern industrial interests?

Q#5 – What was the constitutional rationale the South argued to support a state’s right to secede?

Q#6 – What was the Northern response to the Southern rationale that each state had the right to leave the Union?

Q#7 – In the early 19th century, famous spokesmen such as Andrew Jackson and Daniel Webster were advocating what philosophy regarding the country?

Q#8 – As the 19th Century evolved and time passed, what philosophy regarding the country did Southerners hold?

Q#9 – What was the main reason most of America’s premier entrepreneurs such as Cornelius Vanderbilt and Samuel Colt based themselves in the North?

Q#10 – What action in 1832, where military action was threatened by the Federal government against South Carolina, helped to plant the initial seeds of secession?

Q#11 – What important factor was changing the political balance of power that increasingly was adversely affecting the South?

Q#12 – Why was the “American System” (which was an economic plan) advocated by Henry Clay in Congress and supported by many nationalist supporters, whose purpose was to develop American industry and international commerce, opposed by the South?

Q#13 – What was a mitigating social factor that pushed upper-class white Southerners to support secession from the Union and eventually Civil War?

Q#14 – What economic event occurred in 1857 that strengthened the Republican Party and heightened sectional tensions?

Q#15 – Thomas Prentice Kettell, former editor of the Democratic Review, in the late 1850s gathered an array of statistics published in his book on Southern Wealth and Northern Profits. What premise did Kettell’s book advance that convinced many Southerners their only option for economic fairness was secession?

Quiz for January 29, 2019

What Do You Know About Civil War Prisons and Prisoners?

Q#1 – In July 1862, Union & Confederate armies agreed to formalize the prisoner exchange system. What was the title of the agreement that was named for the two officers who developed it?

Q#2 – The formal prisoner exchange system established a scale of equivalents for the exchange of military officers and enlisted men. What was the scale for a navy captain or an army colonel versus army privates or ordinary seamen?

Q#3 – Did the formal exchange agreement include non-combatants?

Q#4 – What were the specifications that captives had to agree to before they were paroled or exchanged?

Q#5 – Why did the prisoner exchange system collapse in 1863?

Q#6 – Starting in 1863, how many Union soldiers were sent to Confederate prison camps? How many Confederate soldiers were sent to Union prison camps?

Q#7 – Starting in 1863, approximately how many Union soldiers died in Confederate prison camps? How many Confederate soldiers died in Union prison camps?

Q#8 – Which Union prison was sometimes described as “The North’s Andersonville”?

Q#9 – What was the official name assigned by the Confederacy to the prison located at Andersonville, Georgia?

Q#10 – Approximately how many Union prisoners were imprisoned at the Andersonville Prison?

Q#11 – Nearly 13,000 Union prisoners died at Andersonville. What were the three chief causes for the deaths?

Q#12 – What was the name of the Confederate prison where a majority of Union officer prisoners were incarcerated? Where was it located?

Q#13 – What was the name of the Confederate general who escaped from the Ohio Penitentiary in 1863?

Q#14 – What was the nickname Confederate prisoners gave to the prison located at Elmira, NY?

Q#15 – What was the name of the first Federal military installation seized forcefully by a Southern state government that eventually was used as a Confederate prison?

Quiz for November 27, 2018

What Do You Know About Sherman’s March to the Sea?

Q#1 – Initially, Sherman’s March to the Sea had a more formal and official name; what was that name?

Q#2 – What was the primary objective that Grant & Sherman hoped to accomplish with Sherman’s March to the Sea?

Q#3 – The terrain of southeastern Georgia between Atlanta and Savannah was swampy and criss-crossed with numerous rivers and streams. What was the name of the man who was Sherman’s Chief of the Bridge Building Team?

Q#4 – For the campaign, Sherman’s force consisted of 62,000 men: 55,000 infantry, 5,000 cavalry, and 2,000 artillerymen manning 64 guns. What marching formation did Sherman establish for his troops?

Q#5 – Confederate John Bell Hood had taken the bulk of his forces in Georgia on his campaign to Tennessee in hopes of diverting Sherman to pursue him. What was Sherman quoted as saying in response to Hood’s maneuver?

Q#6 – What was the name of the military unit that served as Sherman’s personal escort on the march?

Q#7 – The 300-mile march began on November 15. The first real Confederate resistance was felt by Union General Howard’s right wing on November 22. What was the name of this battle and the results?

Q#8 – In what order did Sherman align his troops as they marched through Georgia?

Q#9 – What orders did General Sherman give to his foragers?

Q#10 – Southern civilians with property in the line of march, before Union troops reached their properties attempted to hide their food and valuables. What two groups of people did the Union troops rely on to help them find these hidden items?

Q#11 – On the few occasions when Union foragers were captured by Confederate troops while they were taking goods from Southern citizens, what was usually their fate?

Q#12 – As Sherman’s march continued towards Savannah, they were joined by a group of approximately 25,000 people. Who were these people?

Q#13 – On December 8, 1864, what tragic incident occurred at a place called Ebeneezer Creek located about 20 miles north of the city of Savannah?

Q#14 – When Sherman’s armies reached the outskirts of Savannah on December 10, what actions did they find that Confederate General William Hardee had performed which blocked Sherman from linking up with the U.S. Navy as he had planned?

Q#15 – On December 17, 1864, Sherman sent a note to Confederate General Hardee demanding the surrender of the city of Savannah. What were Hardee’s and the City of Savannah’s responses?

Quiz for October 30, 2018

Civil War Quiz: Do You Know Who These Civil War Generals Are?

Q#1 – Before the Civil War, this Union general was the Speaker of the House in the US House of Representatives. What’s his name?

Q#2 – This Confederate general gave Thomas J. Jackson his nickname of “Stonewall”. What’s his name?

Q#3 – This Union general commanded the Army of the Ohio at the Battle of Shiloh in 1862. What’s his name?

Q#4 – At the Battle of Gettysburg, this Confederate general was captured by a Union soldier, Private Patrick Maloney of the 2nd Wisconsin, where he was taken behind enemy lines and briefly met an old colleague, Union General Abner Doubleday. This Confederate became the first general officer to be taken captive from the Army of Northern Virginia since General Lee assumed command. What’s his name?

Q#5 – This Union general fought in the Seven Days Battles at Gaines’ Mill on June 27, 1862, where he was wounded but demonstrated the bravery that was eventually recognized in 1892 with the Medal of Honor. What’s his name?

Q#6 – Before the Civil War, this Confederate general who was born in Ireland enlisted in the 41st Regiment of Foot of the British Army. During his three years there, he subsequently rose to the rank of corporal. What’s his name?

Q#7 – This Union general requested reassignment after quarreling with General Joe Hooker after the Battle of Chancellorsville. He then commanded the newly created Department of the Susquehanna during the Gettysburg Campaign in 1863. What’s his name?

Q#8 – Before the Civil War, this Confederate general was a member of the Whig political party and strongly opposed secession at the April 1861 Virginia convention. However, he was soon roused by the actions of the Federal government when President Abraham Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers to suppress the rebellion. What’s his name?

Q#9 – After the Civil War, this Union general was elected as the 20th President of the United States in 1881 and became the second president to die by assassination. What’s his name?

Q#10 – This Confederate general was court-martialed by Stonewall Jackson for his actions in command of the Stonewall Brigade at the First Battle of Kernstown, and was subsequently killed during Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg. What’s his name?

Q#11 – This Union general led the XX Corps competently in the 1864 Atlanta Campaign under Sherman, but asked to be relieved before the capture of the city because of his dissatisfaction with the promotion of Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard to command of the Army of the Tennessee, upon the death of Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson. This general had seniority over Howard. What’s his name?

Q#12 – This Confederate general’s first field assignment was commanding Confederate forces in western Virginia, where he was defeated at the Battle of Cheat Mountain and was widely blamed for Confederate setbacks. He was then sent to organize the coastal defenses along the Carolina and Georgia seaboard and appointed commander, “Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida” on November 5, 1861. What’s his name?

Q#13 – This Union general on November 25, 1862, was arrested and court-martialed for his actions at Second Bull Run. By this time, McClellan had been relieved by President Abraham Lincoln and could not provide political cover for this general who was McClellan’s protégé. This Union General’s association with the disgraced McClellan and his open criticism of Union General Pope were significant reasons for his conviction at court-martial where he was found guilty on January 10, 1863, of disobedience and misconduct, and was dismissed from the Army on January 21, 1863. What’s his name?

Q#14 – This Confederate general was the son-in-law of Union Brigadier General Philip St. George Cooke. Also, the general’s wife’s brother was John Rogers Cooke. What’s his name?

Q#15 – On October 16, 1863, this Union general was assigned command of the newly formed Division of the Mississippi, including the Armies of the Ohio, Tennessee, and Cumberland. His first order was to put General George Thomas in charge of rescuing the Army of the Cumberland, which had retreated into Chattanooga where they were trapped. What’s his name?

Quiz for September 25, 2018

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Native Americans in the American Civil War?

Q#1 – During November 1861, what three Native American tribes fought three pitched battles (Battle of Round Mountain, the Battle of Chusto-Talasah, and the Battle of Chustenahlah) against Confederate troops and other Native Americans that joined the Confederates?

Q#2 – Where was the First Battle of Cabin Creek, which occurred July 1–2, 1863, fought?

Q#3 – What was involved and led to the Tonkawa massacre of October 23–24, 1862?

Q#4 – What were the conditions of the treaty between Cherokee Indians and the Confederate Government signed on October 7, 1861?

Q#5 – What was the Thomas Legion?

Q#6 – What was the name of the Native American Tribe for whom a monument was erected in their honor in Columbia, South Carolina?

Q#7 – What was the name of the most famous Native American unit in the Union Army of the Potomac?

Q#8 – What was the name of a member of the Seneca tribe who assisted in creating the articles of surrender which Generals Grant and Lee signed at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865?

Q#9 – What is the name of the Native American Indian who was the last Confederate General to surrender in the Civil War?

Q#10 – Why was the Cherokee Nation the most negatively affected of all Native American tribes during the Civil War with its population declining from 21,000 to 15,000 by 1865?

Q#11 – During the War, President Abraham Lincoln met with representatives from several major Native American Indian tribes. What advice did he give them at this meeting?

Q#12 – What was the name of the Colonel who led the Colorado Territorial Militia at the Sand Creek Massacre?

Q#13 – What were the root causes of why the Santee Sioux in Minnesota in 1862 attacked and killed American civilians? (Estimates of the number of civilians killed ranged from 450 to 800.)

Q#14 – In January 1862, who led in the creation of the 1st and 2nd Indian Home Guards?

Q#15 – In the aftermath of the Civil War, which Native American Indian groups were totally devastated by the War?

Quiz for August 18, 2018

Civil War Quiz: What Happened in the Month of August During the Civil War?

Q#1 – What significant event did the citizens of the State of Tennessee vote for on August 1, 1861?

Q#2 – On August 3, 1861, a Union naval officer performed what act for the first time from a ship stationed off Hampton Roads, VA?

Q#3 – What was the name of the first significant battle of the Civil War fought in the western theater, on August 10, 1861?

Q#4 – What was the name of the Union General who led the successful amphibious landing that captured Cape Hatteras, NC?

Q#5 – To fund the Civil War, what significant action did the U. S. Congress perform on August 2, 1862?

Q#6 – On August 14, 1862, what order did Union General-in-Chief Henry Halleck give to Union General George McClellan?

Q#7 – On August 17, 1862, Confederate General Robert E Lee took what action with JEB Stuart?

Q#8 – Union General Benjamin Butler on August 22, 1862, took what action regarding the recruitment of soldiers into the Army?

Q#9 – In the aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg, on August 8, 1863, what action did Robert E. Lee perform regarding his role in the Army of Northern Virginia?

Q#10 – What action began in Minnesota on August 18, 1863, that diverted Union military resources away from the Civil War?

Q#11 – On August 21, 1863, what event was performed by William Quantrill’s Raiders?

Q#12 – What was the military engagement that occurred on August 5, 1864, where Union Admiral David Farragut is quoted as giving the following orders: “Damn the torpedoes, go ahead”?

Q#13 – On August 21, 1864, 2,000 Confederates led by Nathan Bedford Forrest occupied what city in Tennessee for a few hours during the day, nearly capturing Major Generals Stephen Hurlbut and C. C. Washburn? (The answer was included in Tom Roza’s April, 2017 Presentation on Forrest.)

Q#14 – What critical battle was fought on August 31, 1864, that led to the Confederates abandoning Atlanta, GA, a few days later?

Q#15 – What legislative action did the State of Mississippi perform on August 14, 1865?