Meeting of October 26, 2021

Bob Sweetman on “How the Union Won the Battle of Gettysburg”

[While our group will be meeting in-person at Holder’s Country Inn, Bob Sweetman will be joining us from Gettysburg, PA, via a ZOOM session.]

The Union victory at Gettysburg was not just a matter of luck—it was the combination of great leadership, courageous fighting spirit, and a fortunate choice of terrain. All three factors came together to allow the Army of the Potomac to achieve a victory. This victory was not certain until the last moments of the battle.

This Zoom talk examines these factors and is a companion to the novel The Loyal, True, and Brave, which chronicles the action between the beginning of the battle of Chancellorsville and the end of the battle of Gettysburg. Set in a narrative form, the format allows the reader to experience the thoughts and motivations of four of the key players in the final Union victory. These four individuals are Generals George Meade, Winfield Hancock, and Daniel Sickles. Sergeant Henry Taylor of the First Minnesota is also one of the individuals.

The talk takes a bigger picture view of the operations, concentrating of the main action and key decisions. One cannot understand what happened at Gettysburg unless they know the events of the battle of Chancellorsville. The talk, then, begins with Chancellorsville, Lee’s greatest victory, and ends with Gettysburg, Lee’s greatest defeat.

Join Bob Sweetman in a fact-filled presentation of the events involved in this critical two months of American history.

Robert J. Sweetman (Bob) has been deeply interested in the American Civil War since his father took him to visit Gettysburg at the age of ten. As a graduate of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point and as an army officer after graduation, he has experience with both the theory and application of the military art. Bob is a member of the Civil War Talk Forum and the Historical Writers of America. He remains an avid student of civil war history. Stay in touch with him at www.robertjsweetman.com and at facebook.com/robertjsweetman.

Quiz for October 26, 2021

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About England’s and France’s Involvement in the Civil War?

FRANCE

Q#1 – What was the Second French Empire official position on the Civil War?

Q#2 – What was a major economic factor that was pushing France to recognize the Confederacy?

Q#3 – What was a major factor regarding any French decision to recognize the Confederacy?

Q#4 – What warning did the US Government issue to France regarding the Civil War?

Q#5 – What population factions in France tended to support the Confederacy?

Q#6 – What population factions in France tended to support the Union?

Q#7 – What action did the French government take regarding the sale of the ironclad CSS Stonewall that was built in France?

ENGLAND

Q#8 – Overall, what was England’s official position on the Civil War?

Q#9 – What tactic was employed early in 1861 by Confederate President Jefferson Davis in an effort to get England to recognize and support the Confederacy?

Q#10 – What impact did the Union blockade of the South have on England and what action was taken as a result?

Q#11 – Generally, what was British public opinion on the Civil War?

Q#12 – What was the Trent Affair?

Q#13 – What became known as the “Alabama Claims”?

Q#14 – What were the positions of the three members of the English Cabinet, Chancellor of the Exchequer William E Gladstone, Foreign Minister Lord Russell, and Prime Minister Lord Palmerston regarding involvement in the Civil War?

Q#15 – What military action during the Civil War pretty much sealed England’s decision not to support the Confederacy?

Meeting of November 30, 2021

Join us at 7 PM, November 30, at Holder’s Country Inn in San Jose. See the UPCOMING MEETINGS/MEETING INFO tab for specific times and meeting details. This month’s topic is

Kristin Patterson on “United States Tax Stamps Used to Raise Funds for the Civil War”

The United States Government enacted its first Federal Tax on October 1, 1862, to raise money to support a Civil War that had been going on much longer than President Lincoln had anticipated. This presentation will talk about the different revenue stamps that were created including ones inscribed Agreement, Bank Check, Certificate, Insurance, Mortgage, Playing Cards, Probate of Will, Proprietary, and more, ranging in face value from 1¢ to $200. These stamps are gorgeous pieces of history with many still attached to the item for which they collected the tax.

An 1865 receipt for salary payment to Brigadier General Lucius Fairchild who at the time was Wisconsin Secretary of State.

Kristin started collecting postage stamps when she was 10. For the past 20 years, she has focused on U.S. Civil War tax stamps and documents with revenue stamps. She has been very active in the philatelic community, serving 4 years as President of Sequoia Stamp Club, 15 years as Chair of PENPEX Stamp Show (www.penpex.org), and currently serving on the American Philatelic Research Library Board.

Kristin has authored two books. In 2003, she self published It’s a Wrap! U.S. Revenue Stamps Used on Playing Cards, 1862–1883. This colorfully illustrated book highlights fifteen U.S. Playing Card Manufacturers. In 2010, she published her second book, WESTPEX – The First 50 Years, about the most successful stamp show in the U.S.

Kristin has also written many articles for philatelic journals, including the Soldiers’ National Cemetery at Gettysburg. This article discusses how the Gettysburg Cemetery came to be and how the union states funded the effort.

Kristin has donated for our raffle some taxed documents (signed by Civil War Brigadier Generals) from the period she will be talking about in her presentation. Make sure to purchase some raffle tickets at this meeting; all proceeds go to the SBCWRT. We hope to see you November 30, 2021.

Meeting of January 25, 2022

Join us at 7 PM, January 25, 2022, at Holder’s Country Inn in San Jose. See the UPCOMING MEETINGS/MEETING INFO tab for specific times and meeting details. This month’s topic is

Meg Groeling on “First Fallen: The Life of Colonel Elmer Ellsworth, the North’s First Civil War Hero”

Colonel Elmer Ellsworth was the first Union officer killed in the American Civil War. When it happened, on May 24, 1861, the entire North was aghast. Ellsworth was a celebrity and had just finished traveling with his famed and entertaining U. S. Zouave Cadets drill team. They had performed at West Point, in New York City, and for President Buchanan before returning home to Chicago. Ellsworth then joined his friend and law mentor Abraham Lincoln in his quest for the presidency. When Lincoln put out the call for troops after Fort Sumter was fired upon, Ellsworth responded. Within days he was able to organize over a thousand New York firefighters into a regiment of volunteers.

Was it youthful enthusiasm or a lack of formal training that resulted in his death? There is evidence on both sides. What is definite is that the Lincolns rushed to the Navy Yard to view the body of the young man they had loved as a son. Mary Lincoln insisted that he lie in state in the East Room of their home. The elite of New York brought flowers to the Astor House en memoriam. Six members of the 11th New York accompanied their commander’s coffin. When the young colonel’s remains were finally interred in the Hudson View Cemetery, the skies opened up. A late May afternoon thunderstorm broke out in the middle of the procession, referred to as “tears from God himself.” Only eight weeks later, the results of the battle of First Bull Run knocked Ellsworth out of the headlines. The trickle of blood had now become a torrent, not to end for four more years of war.

The story of Ellsworth’s life is complex, and fascinating, but it is also the story of many young men who fought and died for the Union. Elmer, however, was the first and -according to those who remember him – perhaps the best. Join us and REMEMBER ELLSWORTH!

Meg Groeling has spent years examining archival resources, diaries, personal letters, newspapers, and other accounts to tell Ellsworth’s story. In the sixty intervening years since the last portrait of Ellsworth was written, new information has arisen that gives readers and historians a better understanding of the Ellsworth phenomenon. She has included accounts of John Hay, George Nicolay, Abraham Lincoln, and the Lincoln family which put Ellsworth clearly at the forefront of the excitement that led up to the 1860 election of a president.

Meeting of September 28, 2021

Jim Rhetta on “Tennessee, the Strategic Value of the State”

Most attention of writers on the Civil War is focused on events and leaders in the Northern Virginia area of operations. What many overlook is that Tennessee had an important strategic position that both sides valued for their war efforts. Most battles fought in the state were not just meeting engagements between armies, but were to protect or seize key rail, river, and infrastructure systems that both sides viewed as essential.

Tennessee had a rail and river system essential for Confederate movements that would also enable the Federal Army to advance in the deep south to seize the industrial areas of Atlanta and Savannah. The conflict over this river and rail network would draw the Federal Army of the Tennessee into combat against the Confederate Army of Tennessee.

This topic will have both a slide presentation on the strategic value and operations in the state as well as a 25-min video on the subject with human accounts of the impact of the conflict in Tennessee.

Quiz for September 28, 2021

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Generals Killed During The Civil War?

Q#1 — This general was killed on April 2, 1865 by a Union soldier, Corporal John W. Mauck of the 138th Pennsylvania. Name him.

Q#2 — After his death his old West Point classmate John Bell Hood paid a warm tribute to his character. He was the second-highest-ranking Union officer killed in action during the war. Name him.

Q#3 — This Civil War battle started disastrously for the Confederates as the general commanding the right wing and his second in command were killed very early in the engagement. Name the battle and the generals.

Q#4 — Generals Robert S. Garnett and Felix Kirk Zollicoffer have this distinction. What is it?

Q#5 — What were the circumstances of Union General W. H. L. Wallace’s death?

Q#6 — This Confederate general was killed at the Battle of Yellow Tavern. Name him.

Q#7 — Two of Pickett’s three brigade commanders were killed during Pickett’s charge. Name them.

Q#8 — This Confederate general uttered the phrase “There is Jackson standing like a stone wall,” leading to Stonewall Jackson’s nickname but was mortally wounded shortly thereafter. Name him.

Q#9 — He was the first Union general to die in the Civil War. Name him.

Q#10 — Killed by a sniper, among his last words were “They couldn’t hit an elephant at this distance.” Name him.

Q#11 — He was the highest-ranking officer, Union or Confederate, killed during the entire war. Name him.

Q#12 — This Confederate general was killed by a Federal 3-inch shell at Pine Mountain, Georgia on June 14, 1864. Name him.

Q#13 — Union general John F. Reynolds was killed at the start of the Battle of Gettysburg. Why is his death considered controversial by historians?

Q#14 — This battle saw the deaths of six Confederate generals. Name the battle and the generals.

Q#15 — What were the circumstances of Union General William “Bull” Nelson’s death?

Meeting of August 31, 2021

Abby Eller on “King Cotton”

The Confederacy was confident that a cotton embargo would induce Britain and France to ally with the Confederacy. Why was the South so confident of this? Cotton was indeed King,… but not in the way the South thought it was. Come hear the fascinating story of cotton and its importance in the world economy since the 19th century.

Abby Eller has long been a history lover, American history especially, because history explains how we got to now. Abby is fascinated by the Civil War as the single most transformative event in American history.

Quiz for August 31, 2021

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Joseph “Fighting Joe” Hooker?

Q#1 – Joseph “Fighting Joe” Hooker was born on November 13, 1814. In what town and state was he born?

Q#2 – What American Revolutionary War captain was Joe Hooker the grandson of and named for?

Q#3 – Hooker graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1837, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 1st U.S. Artillery. Out of a class of 50, where did Hooker rank?

Q#4 – During his time in Mexico during the War, his reputation as a ladies’ man earned him what name with the local Mexican girls?

Q#5 – Why did Hooker resign his military commission in 1853?

Q#6 – After leaving the military, Hooker became a farmer and land developer, and ran unsuccessfully for election to represent his region in the state legislature. And from 1859 to 1861, he held a commission as a colonel of a militia unit. What county and state did this occur in?

Q#7 – As still part of a state militia unit, after Hooker witnessed the Union Army defeat at the First Battle of Bull Run, he wrote a letter that complained of military mismanagement, promoted his own qualifications, and requested a commission in the regular Union Army. Who did Hooker send his letter to?

Q#8 – At Antietam, Hooker left the battle early in the morning with what type of wound?

Q#9 – After Fredericksburg and the humiliating Mud March, what was General Ambrose Burnside’s reaction to severe criticism leveled at him by Hooker?

Q#10 – At the Battle of Chancellorsville, what personal event contributed to Hooker’s defeat and subsequent retreat?

Q#11 – During the 1864 Atlanta Campaign under Sherman, Hooker led his XX Corps competently, but asked to be relieved of command before the capture of the Atlanta. Why?

Q#12 – What was Hooker’s role in Lincoln’s funeral procession in Springfield, IL, on May 4th, 1865?

Q#13 – After Leaving the military in 1866, Hooker’s life was marred by poor health. What severe medical event happened to him?

Q#14 – What is the story regarding how Hooker was given the name “Fighting Joe?”

Q#15 – True or False: The term “Hooker” began to be associated with prostitutes because a band of prostitutes that followed Hooker’s division was derisively referred to as “General Hooker’s Army” or “Hooker’s Brigade.”

Fort Point Civil War Tour, August 28, 2021

The South Bay Civil War Round Table has scheduled a special event to help celebrate the return to in-person Roundtable meetings. On Saturday, August 28, 2021, a tour of the Civil War era Fort Point facility in San Francisco has been arranged. Here is the schedule:

Noon: Meet at Holder’s Country Inn; park in back parking lot at restaurant

Noon–1 pm: Carpool to Fort Point in San Francisco

1–4 pm: Tour Fort Point

4–5 pm: Carpool back to Holder’s

5–7 pm: Dinner at Holder’s

2021 West Coast Civil War Round Table Conference Announced

Canceled! 2021 West Coast Civil War Round Table Conference

This conference has been postponed until November 4–6, 2022, because of continued coronavirus concerns.

Combat Strategy and Tactics, Grant vs Lee in 1864

November 5–7, 2021

Featuring speakers including Gordon Rhea, Eric Wittenburg, Chris Mackowski, Jim Stanbery, and Brian Clague.

Hosted by San Joaquin Valley Civil War Round Table

Wyndham Garden Fresno Airport
5090 E. Clinton Way, Fresno
(559-252-3611)
$103 per night

Attendee Registration

$200 Per person including meals (Breakfast on your own; coffee & pastries provided. Non participants who wish dinner Friday or Saturday Night: $30 each meal.)

NAME:________________________________________
ADDRESS:_____________________________________
EMAIL:_________________________________________
Member of a CWRT? ______________________________

Please address check to SJVCWRT
SEND TO Ron Vaughan (Conference Co-ordinator)
730 E. Tulare Ave,
Tulare, CA 93274

Questions? ronvaughan@prodigy.net