Quiz for November 25, 2014

Civil War Quiz: What Do You Know About Ulysses S. Grant?

Q#1 – What was Ulysses S. Grant’s birth date?

Q#2 – What was Ulysses S. Grant’s birth name?

Q#3 – What town and state was US Grant born in?

Q#4 – How did Grant’s name get changed to Ulysses S. Grant?

Q#5 – What nickname did Grant go by when at West Point?

Q#6 – Grant graduated from West Point in 1843 with a class of 39 – where did Grant rank in his class?

Q#7 – Grant fought in the Mexican War. In his memoirs, what did Grant write about his thoughts on that war?

Q#8 – What was the maiden name of the woman that Grant married?

Q#9 – In 1856, Grant and his family moved to a section of his father-in-law’s farm and, to give his family a home, built a house. What name did he give to the house?

Q#10 – Early in the Civil War, how did Grant earn the nickname “Unconditional Surrender” Grant?

Q#11 – What was the month and year when President Lincoln named Grant commander of all Union armies?

Q#12 – What was the reason Grant declined President Lincoln’s invitation to attend together a play at Ford’s Theater on April 14, 1865?

Q#13 – What was the name of the Democrat Party’s candidate that Grant defeated in the Presidential election on 1868?

Q#14 – After leaving the office of President in 1877, what did Grant and his family do?

Q#15 – What was the medical condition that Grant eventually died from?

Meeting of September 30, 2014

Hal Jespersen on “Civil War Cartography”

CWMaps web page

CWMaps web page

Readers say that one of the most important features of a modern book about the Civil War is a good collection of understandable, accurate maps. Hal’s presentation will reveal some of the details behind the process for creating such maps. Hal Jespersen’s cartography business has produced over 800 maps for Wikipedia and numerous books, magazines, and battlefield displays. Hal discussed  the state of mapmaking during the war, reviewed the work of some famous cartographers, and described tools and processes he uses to create maps. Some of the technical concepts included were projection, elevation rendering, evaluating the accuracy of the Official Records Atlas, and plotting the courses of 19th century rivers, roads, and railroads.

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Quiz for September 30, 2014

Civil War Quiz – What Happened During the Month of September, 1861-1865?

Q#1 – In September 1861, President Lincoln revokes an unauthorized military proclamation of emancipation in Missouri and relieved the Union commander who issued it. What was the name of that Union commander?

Q#2 – What was the date of the Battle of Antietam?

Q#3 – What action did President Lincoln take on September 22, 1862?

Q#4 – The Battle of Chickamauga was fought on September 19/20, 1863. What were the names of the Confederate and Union commanders?

Q#5 – What significant Union victory occurred on September 2, 1864?

Q#6 – What major military action occurred during September 12-15 that was part of Lee’s first invasion of the North?

Q#7 – After many failed attempts to capture it, what Confederate fort located in South Carolina was finally captured by Union troops on September 7, 1863?

Q#8 – What was the name of the battle that was fought on September 12-20, 1861, in Missouri that was won by the Confederates and threatened to keep Missouri in the Union?

Q#9 – On September 4, 1861, a Confederate army moved into Kentucky, occupied Columbus, and began occupying high ground overlooking the Ohio River. What was the name of the Confederate commander?

Q#10 – Following Union general Pope’s disastrous defeat at the Battle of Second Bull Run, what action did President Lincoln take on September 2, 1862?

Q#11 – What major legal action did President Lincoln take on September 24, 1862, that now affected all the states in the North?

Q#12 – On September 8, 1863, the Second Battle of Sabine Pass was fought when a Union flotilla of four gunboats and seven troop transports steamed into Sabine Pass and up the Sabine River. What was the reason for this military engagement?

Q#13 – What was the name of the battle fought on September 21-22, 1864, when Union general Philip Sheridan defeated the Confederate army led by General Jubal Early, which opened up the Shenandoah Valley to a Union “scorched earth” invasion that became known as the “Burning” or “Red October”?

Q#14 – During March 19-21, 1865, what battle was fought in North Carolina?

Q#15 – What was the name of the battle fought on September 14, 1862, initiated by Union General George McClellan after he found Lee’s General Order 191?

Meeting of August 23, 2014

Jim Rhetta on “Slavery & Slave Ancestry”

Jim Rhetta and John Herberich

Jim Rhetta and John Herberich at the 2014 Picnic

Jim’s two-part presentation started with Slavery, a Socioeconomic System. It discussed the economic conditions that created slavery, the comparative value of slaves, and the emerging financial forces on slavery. The South was unaware that the increasing amount of currency in circulation, growing immigrant-fueled labor pool, and changing social values were threatening the economic viability of slavery. These emerging socioeconomic forces would have eventually made slavery unprofitable had the Civil War not been fought.

The second part was on Tangled and Incomplete, Tracing Slave Family Histories. It presented the difficulties of researching African-American family histories due to the forced illiteracy in slavery, limited census data, and paucity of travel, legal, and property records. It includes the family history of Jim’s Great-Grandfather’s slave-holders as well as both sides of his family. The value of oral traditions and histories were revealed in this 40-year search of his family history.

Meeting Minutes August 2014

Quiz for August 23, 2014

Civil War Quiz – The Battle of Shiloh

Q#1 – What is another name given to the Battle of Shiloh?

Q#2 – What were the dates when the Battle of Shiloh was fought?

Q#3 – What was the name of the main river that bordered on the Battle of Shiloh?

Q#4 – What were the names of the two Confederate commanding generals at the Battle of Shiloh?

Q#5 – What was the name of the Union Army led by Ulysses S. Grant at the Battle of Shiloh?

Q#6 – What was the name of the Confederate Army that fought at the Battle of Shiloh?

Q#7 – In March 1862, Henry Halleck then Union commander of the Department of the Missouri replaced Ulysses S. Grant as the leader of the western Tennessee offensive with another Union general – then shortly thereafter reinstated Grant as the leader. What was the general’s name who replaced Grant and then was replaced by Grant?

Q#8 – What was the name of the nearby town where Confederate forces assembled prior to their attack against the Union forces located in the vicinity of the Shiloh Church?

Q#9 – Before the battle began, a Union Colonel under General William Sherman warned Sherman that a Confederate attack was imminent. What was Sherman’s response?

Q#10 – Where was Union General Grant located at the time the Confederates started their initial attack at Shiloh?

Q#11 – On the first day of the battle, Union troops formed a defensive line in a field along a road now popularly called the “Sunken Road” where intense fighting occurred. After the battle, what name was given to this location?

Q#12 – Albert Sidney Johnston bled to death on the battlefield of a wound he suffered. What area of his body was he wounded?

Q#13 – On the evening of the first day of battle, Union General Sherman remarked to Grant, “Well, Grant, we’ve had the devil’s own day, haven’t we?” What was Grant’s response?

Q#14 – Who was the Union division commander who arrived late with reinforcements that helped turned the battle towards the Union forces?

Q#15 – What were the reasons the Confederate commanding general withdrew from the battlefield?

Quiz for July 29, 2014

Who Won the Battle?

Q#1 – Who Won the Battle of Big Bethel – Virginia – June 10, 1861?

Q#2 – Who Won the Battle of Wilson’s Creek – Missouri – August 10, 1861?

Q#3 – Who Won the Battle of Fort Henry – Tennessee – February 6, 1862?

Q#4 – Who Won the Battle of Pea Ridge – Arkansas – March 6–8, 1862?

Q#5 – Who Won the Battle of Glorieta Pass – New Mexico Territory – March 26–28, 1862?

Q#6 – Who Won the Battle of Forts Jackson and St. Philip – Louisiana – April 18–28, 1862?

Q#7 – Who Won the Battle of Cross Keys – Virginia – June 8, 1862?

Q#8 – Who Won the First Battle of Murfreesboro – Tennessee – July 13, 1862?

Q#9 – Who Won the Battle of South Mountain – Maryland – September 14, 1862?

Q#10 – Who Won the Battle of Perryville – Kentucky – October 8, 1862?

Q#11 – Who Won the Battle of Salem Church – Virginia – May 3–4, 1863?

Q#12 – Who Won the Battle of Fort Pillow – Tennessee – April 12, 1864?

Q#13 – Who Won the Battle of Yellow Tavern – Virginia – May 11, 1864?

Q#14 – Who Won the Battle of Jonesborough – Georgia – August 31–September 1, 1864?

Q#15 – Who Won the Battle of Palmito Ranch – Texas – May 12–13, 1865?

2014 West Coast Civil War Conference Announced

2014 West Coast Civil War Conference Announced

Craig L. Symonds and Harold Holzer

The Sacramento CWRT will host the West Coast Civil War Conference, November 7-9, 2014. The theme will be “1864” and the fun and learning will start on November 7th (Friday afternoon) with a late afternoon social hour, dinner, and speech. As usual, the activities continue on Saturday with another social hour, dinner, and speech at night. The Conference will continue until Sunday noon when we will all return to our homes.

2014 West Coast Conference Program

2014 Conference Registration Form

We have the commitments of two very well known Civil War historians to provide much of the action over the weekend. Craig Symonds and Harold Holzer will be doing the heavy lifting. We are evaluating along with them a new format for them at some time over the weekend. This would be a “conversational” format where Craig and Hal would sit in easy chairs in front of the room and carry on a conversation about the events of 1864 – giving their views on issues beyond just relating the facts. What an innovation this could be!!! There will be other speakers and activities as well and a detailed agenda will be released in the near future. Hotel rooms including a hot breakfast buffet will cost $99 for up to two people per room. Stay tuned for more! For questions, email Paul Ruud at ruud@starband.net, George W. Foxworth at gwfoxworth@sbcglobal.net, or Don Hayden at djhbooklover@yahoo.com.

Crowne Plaza Hotel (a Holiday Inn Hotel)
5321 Date Avenue
Sacramento, CA 95841-2512
916-338-5800
877-504-0054

For reservations, please say Sacramento Civil War Round Table to get the $99 block of rooms.

Meeting of June 24, 2014

Tom Roza on “Ambrose Powell Hill, A Confederate Warrior: Gettysburg to Petersburg”

During the four year history of the Civil War, there have been a number of military leaders on both sides who exhibited a wide variety of both strategic and tactical skills as well as personal courage under fire. For the Union, there were Joshua Chamberlain, Ulysses S. Grant, William Sherman, and Philip Sheridan among others. For the South, you have Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, Stonewall Jackson, and Nathan Bedford Forrest.

But, there is one other person who is on a par with these individuals: Ambrose Powell Hill of Virginia. Hill’s entire adult life was spent in the military and during that period, his body was wracked with a variety of medical illnesses and maladies. Despite his very poor health, which deteriorated over time, Hill rose to become the best division commander in the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and finally the Corps Commander of Lee’s Third Corp. Hill’s exceptional battlefield tactics were nowhere better demonstrated then at the Battle of Antietam when he marched his troops 17 miles and saved Lee’s army from almost certain destruction.

Despite Hill’s exceptional qualities as a battlefield commander, he often had run-ins with his superiors that resulted in Hill being arrested on several occasions and relieved of command, only to be reinstated when the Army really needed him. Hill was involved in virtually every major military event that the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia was involved in from First Bull Run in July 1861 to the collapse of the Southern defense of Petersburg in April 1865.

The story of A.P. Hill takes numerous interesting twists and turns both in his personal and military lives. And, Hill’s interaction with his troops and his superiors reveals numerous little known insights into what made the Army of Northern Virginia the effective fighting force it became. Therefore, in order to do justice to telling the story of AP Hill, there will be two presentations:

  • May: West Point to Chancellorsville
  • June: Gettysburg to Petersburg

Tom Roza has been a student of the American Civil War since 1960 and has toured several battlefields that AP Hill participated at (Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Courthouse). This provided Tom with the ability to see first-hand the terrain where Hill led his troops in combat and these experiences have helped shape the content of the presentations.

Tom’s previous presentations for the SBCWRT have been on John Buford, Winfield Scott Hancock, and Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment.

Meeting Minutes June 2014

Meeting of May 27, 2014

Tom Roza on “Ambrose Powell Hill, A Confederate Warrior: West Point to Chancellorsville”

A.P. Hill (Wikipedia)

During the four year history of the Civil War, there have been a number of military leaders on both sides who exhibited a wide variety of both strategic and tactical skills as well as personal courage under fire. For the Union, there were Joshua Chamberlain, Ulysses S. Grant, William Sherman, and Philip Sheridan among others. For the South, you have Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, Stonewall Jackson, and Nathan Bedford Forrest.

But, there is one other person who is on a par with these individuals: Ambrose Powell Hill of Virginia. Hill’s entire adult life was spent in the military and during that period, his body was wracked with a variety of medical illnesses and maladies. Despite his very poor health, which deteriorated over time, Hill rose to become the best division commander in the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia and finally the Corps Commander of Lee’s Third Corp. Hill’s exceptional battlefield tactics were nowhere better demonstrated then at the Battle of Antietam when he marched his troops 17 miles and saved Lee’s army from almost certain destruction.

Despite Hill’s exceptional qualities as a battlefield commander, he often had run-ins with his superiors that resulted in Hill being arrested on several occasions and relieved of command, only to be reinstated when the Army really needed him. Hill was involved in virtually every major military event that the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia was involved in from First Bull Run in July 1861 to the collapse of the Southern defense of Petersburg in April 1865.

The story of A.P. Hill takes numerous interesting twists and turns both in his personal and military lives. And, Hill’s interaction with his troops and his superiors reveals numerous little known insights into what made the Army of Northern Virginia the effective fighting force it became. Therefore, in order to do justice to telling the story of AP Hill, there will be two presentations:

  • May: West Point to Chancellorsville
  • June: Gettysburg to Petersburg

Tom Roza has been a student of the American Civil War since 1960 and has toured several battlefields that AP Hill participated at (Bull Run, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Courthouse). This provided Tom with the ability to see first-hand the terrain where Hill led his troops in combat and these experiences have helped shape the content of the presentations.

Tom’s previous presentations for the SBCWRT have been on John Buford, Winfield Scott Hancock, and Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Massachusetts Regiment.

Meeting Minutes May 2014

Meeting of April 29, 2014

Dave Wildman on “Iowa’s Martyr Regiment, The Story of the Thirty-eighth Iowa Infantry”

Dave Wildman

Dave Wildman

(From Drew @ Civil War Books and Authors)

Iowa’s Martyr Regiment: The Story of the Thirty-eighth Iowa Infantry, “is another fine unit history. But it is not a typical one. While many Hawkeye formations forged enviable battle records in the western and Trans-Mississippi theaters, the 38th always seemed to miss the action. Nevertheless, the roster of dead was incredibly high for such a comparatively meager combat history. While only two men were killed in action or mortally wounded, sickness sent over 300 of its soldiers to an early grave.”

In its battle with disease, the Thirty-eighth suffered a no less honored destiny than many regiments whose flags were covered with the names of battles. Combined with those discharged for disability and its combat casualties the Regiment suffered a fifty percent casualty rate without participating in any one of the great battles of the war. These dead are scattered along the Mississippi River from Dubuque, Iowa to New Orleans, and along the Gulf coast from Brownsville, Texas to Barrancas, Florida. Unlike other regiments, perhaps the Thirty-eighth Iowa’s battle flag should have been covered in black crepe, indicative of its fight with an unseen monster. Continue reading